Recipes from Our Kitchen

Pappardelle alla MacerateseBy Heather Erica von BargenThis recipe was inspired by one that I found in The Pasta Codex, a classic Italian book originally published in 1973. It was published in English in the United States in 2020. It's easy and fast to make and the anchovies add a umami flavor that pairs well with the pancetta and ground beef. Macerata, where this recipe comes from, is our provincial capital and is visible from Casa Pace e Gioia.
Riso Curgo co’ lo Sugo FintoBy Heather Erica von BargenCurgo Rice with "Fake Sauce." This is an old Marchigiana recipe that reflects the "cucina povera" typical of the region. It was shared by Locanda La Logge in nearby Urbisaglia where chef Andrea takes dishes rich in local history and adds creative elements.
Ragù alla BologneseBy Heather Erica von BargenThis recipe is courtesy of Massimilano Migliorelli (Max), an amazing private chef who prepares and serves fabulous local dishes in memorable dinners at Casa Pace e Gioia. He advises to cut the vegetables in large quantities and freeze them in a bag so when you need some, you have them already prepared.
Lasagne with stewed vegetables and pesto sauceBy Heather Erica von BargenThis recipe was graciously given to us by Chefaway Italian Cooking Experience. They make delicious private chef dinners and entertaining Italian food demonstrations from mozzarella, pizza, and pasta to gelato. Lasagne with stewed vegetables and pesto sauce is one of their most popular dishes served at the many weddings they cater.
Best Ever Olive Oil Cake RecipeBy Heather Erica von BargenI tried and tweaked several olive oil cake recipes to come up with this one, adapted from Bon Appetit magazine. My daughter calls it sad cake, because that’s how you feel when it’s gone. It’s perfect for breakfast and dessert, and it’s not difficult to make! It lasts for days covered loosely. Even my cat loves it.
Le Marche RisottoBy Heather Erica von BargenI served “Le Marche Risotto” at a dinner party and it was a hit with everyone. Its savory taste belies the ease to prepare, and the unexpected flavor combination is fancy-restaurant worthy. I found this recipe in the only English cookbook I’ve found about Le Marche: Cucina of Le Marche, by Fabio Trabocchi, who was born there. In the book, Chef Fabio writes that what makes this recipe Marchigiana is the cinnamon that: “reflects the long relationship Le Marche had with seafarers of North Africa and the spice traders of the East.” The recipe makes a huge portion. While it reheats very well, it’s easily halved. Pair it with a Verdicchio.
Fried Sage LeavesBy Heather Erica von BargenOur kitchen garden has an abundance of sage leaves and this is an easy way to prepare them. You could substitute zucchini flowers, onion, eggplant, carrots, zucchini, cauliflower, or even cheese.